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The Associate

I just completed reading a book by John Grisham, The Associate. It has been a while since I read a novel like that. It was exciting to get back to reading with so much passion and curiosity for the characters and the story.
The Associate revolves around the life of one Kyle McAvoy who recently graduated from law school. On his way back from a little league game, he is shadowed by a couple of strange looking men in dark suits. This is where his life turns upside-down and he is forced into the world of corporate espionage.



Kyle had his life sorted out before, shall we say, the incident. After the incident he got dragged into a life that he did not want but one that he ultimately had to choose. How many people have their life sorted out right after college? I certainly didn't. I don't know where I am going or how I am going to get there. One thing I do know, however, is that I am not alone.

The book details the incredibly tedious lives of the associates at a huge multinational firm. Saying 'incredibly tedious' is probably putting it mildly. Their lives, in the story, were miserable. It makes me wonder, why people would like to study law in the first place but then I realize that bending the rules to get what you want is probably very interesting and it is also a useful skill to have. I'm not saying that all lawyers are sleazy, money craving scumbags; I am not saying that at all. But most of the people I know grew up in an environment where lawyers were the proverbial bad guys.

Ultimately, Kyle McAvoy's life is straightened out. Of course, not as straight as it was before. It is kind of like trying to straighten a metal wire after it's been spiraled, you can never quite straighten it to its original state. The ending was more reasonable than I thought it would be. I can only hope that the lives of us non-fictional people turn out just as fine. 

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